LIBRARY HOURS: MON-THU 10-8pm FRI 10-6pm SAT 10-5pm & SUN 1-5pm | Closures | (307) 733-2164

The Teton County Library

Font Size:



eBooks

 

Reviews - GoodReads.com

Teton County Library39members - Join Our Group
This is a group for library patrons and staff to review books they've read and share what they are currently reading.


Non-Fiction Reviews: (View All)

  • Mao and Me
  • Author: Chen Jiang Hong
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: Teton Co Call No: J 951.056 Chen J
    Julia's rating: 4 stars

    I've long been intrigued with the cover of this book and its placement in the library. A book about growing up in China under Mao - for children? I wondered.

    Finally, I sat down to read this curious picture book. And, I am so pleased that I did because this thoughtful, informative and sometimes sad book serves as yet another reminder that children's literature is simply not just for kids. And, that picture books may not always be aimed at the youngest of children.

    The story, written and illustrated by Chen Jiang Hong, is a memoir about the author's life growing up before, during and after Mao's Cultural Revolution. It's a beautiful story about traditions, family and survival, while also a bracing reminder about sacrifice, survival and mortality. The illustrations are magnificent, too.

    I would recommend this book for high school students - and anyone older - interested in learning about modern Chinese history. It's a brief look but one with depth and scope.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

  • Great Big Book of Children's Games
  • Author: Debra Wise
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: J 796 Wise D.

    Kay's rating: 3.5 stars

    This is a good resource for parents, grandparents and early childhood & elementary teachers. The games included in this book will get children moving and will take them outdoors; perfect for summer time fun.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  



Fiction Reviews:(View All)

  • The Iron Trial (Magisterium, #1)
  • Author: Cassandra Clare
  • User Rating: 4
  • Review: TLC CALL #: J BLACK H

    Chris’s Rating: 3.75 Stars
    Callum (Call) Hunt is “invited” to participate in an exclusive test which may qualify him to become an apprentice at Magisterium, where he would be taught in the ways of elemental magic. His father and mother before him were both mages, but after losing his wife to a magic war years before, Alastair Hunt has warned his son that not all is what as seems. In fact, his father convinces Call that he must fail at all costs. Failing should be easy, especially for a partially crippled boy like Call; but even doing his worst cannot ensure he won’t be chosen as a mage’s apprentice. When everything backfires, Call finds himself both friends and enemies in the underground magic school where elementals roam and darker creatures haunt the woods without.
    Mix: Harry Potter (basic elements), Jack Blank (the protagonist) and H.I.V.E. (the environment + a small bit of the protagonist), with a little bit of elemental magic and you get…The Iron Trail (Magisterium)…so nothing entirely new, but good in its own right. Call’s test at the first of the book is hilarious. I did not, however, find Call as snarky intelligent as the narrative made him out to be. There are several hooks to keep the reader guessing, although as things unraveled I found the “fear” and “power” of chaos mages to be overrated (based on how things went in a cave full of wizards were not even prepared for real combat). Good for anyone who liked any of the above three series (unless you are the type who can’t stand it when a book has similarities…if you are I’m afraid you’re in for many reading disappointments as very few books fail to draw on predecessors). If I had to place an age range I’d say anywhere from 8-13.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

  • Deltora Quest: Special Edition, Books 1-4
  • Author: Emily Rodda
  • User Rating: 3
  • Review: TCL Call #: J Rodda E

    Chris’s Rating: 3 Stars
    With the Kings of Deltora having lost their way by following senseless traditions, the Shadow Lord is able to overthrow the land and steal the one thing that kept him at bay…the magical belt of Deltora. Years later Lief, son of one of the king’s past servants, posing as blacksmith, sets out on an epic quest to restore the belt of Deltora. While his father was able to save the belt itself, the magical gems which gave the item its power have been scattered throughout the land in the most dangerous of locations. With the aid of Barda (briefly trained as a palace guard) and Jasmine (a girl who speaks to trees and animals), Lief fights his way past an impressive knight holding the key to immortality, a sorceress with the power to morph others to her will, as well as many other dangers. Each book takes the reader through a new horror as the magic stones are slowly recovered and restored to the belt itself.
    The Deltora Quest is a black and white fantasy with a unique voice. The books are relatively short, contain riddles and each move from one adventure to the next without relying too heavily on the previous story. Parts of it seem very predictable, but I haven’t read clear to the end of the series to confirm my suspicions. There are two things that would have made the story appeal more to me. The first is that most of the riddles and codes are ones that I have already encountered in other stories (I’m not sure exactly where or which stories predate each other) making their actual cleverness lessen for me. The second is although Lief and his friends face peril, they seldom seem to argue…okay they argue, but the arguments end so quickly, or at least seem to end so easily that it really doesn’t seem like an argument. Everything is painted black and white with little in-between. I would have liked a little more complexity, even from a book written for children. Other than that, the stories themselves are clean (safe for even younger children) and the adventures are interesting enough (although I may never get to the end of the series). Recommended for children 9-12 who like classic fantasy in olden-make-believe settings.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •